Lolita Proofs Are Here

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The proofs of the article on Lolita that I wrote about here have arrived! This is good because it means the essay and the collection will soon be out, The Palgrave Handbook of Affect Studies and Textual CriticismOn the other hand, it is scary because of pronouncements like, “After you have finalized your proof, no further changes can be made.”

And there are problems. I am already leery because I know editing is a lost and disregarded art these days. It doesn’t help that they claimed a perfectly good sentence of mine about Humbert and Lolita journeying (so there’s your subject and verb) was incomplete, while missing at least five things that were wrong. And when I cited other parts of the collection I left question marks instead of page numbers because I was working from the document of the manuscript, not the set-up book. They left the question marks, in at least one case, which means I have to check all the cases and ask one of the editors (good thing he’s my husband) to give me page numbers from the proof of the manuscript. And one more thing: why can’t Word work out how to turn quotation marks and apostrophes the right way? This is fiendishly difficult to catch.

OK, end of rant. If you need me, I’ll be here, in front of my computer, for some time.

Photo credit: Alex Bakharev (assumed), Samizadat copies of en:Vladimir Nabokov’s works Colection [sic] of en:Nabokov House, 14 April 2006, Wikimedia Commons, PD.

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Malevolent Soap Acceptance

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I’m pleased to announce that my poem, “Out in the Code,” has been accepted for the first issue of Malevolent Soap, due out September 1st. I am especially happy and relieved because once again I tried something new in this poem. It is my only work structured as a sort of list, although, being a list by me, it goes off the rails pretty quickly. Also, I use mathematical symbols in it.

I am also excited to appear in an Australian publication for the first time. I was not at all sure “Out in the Code” would meet with the editors’ approval. Although it deals with disorientation caused by the passage of time and the pace of contemporary life and confronts fears, including the fear of death, it is on the whole a brief, playful piece. I was not sure it was hip enough for a journal that wants pieces to “explore . . .  intersections of ‘high’ and ‘low’ culture.” But apparently, yes it was.

I am honored to be included in what sounds like a very cool project. Can’t wait to see the first issue!

photo credit: Buildings at MIT. Taken by me. CC.

 

Quilting with Unstitched States

 

IMG_1942Last spring I spent a lot of time researching and writing the Lolita essay that I blogged about here. As a result I did not get a lot of other writing out, so there has been a hiatus in acceptances.

But I am back in the game now, and proud to say that I have added a square to the collaborative virtual quilt being created by the curators of Unstitched States. Collectively, the squares are “a testament of solidarity to the principles of equality and dignity” in the face of the recent and ongoing escalation of “hate acts” in our communities.

I am honored to have contributed to the quilt. I recommend Unstitched States not only to artists looking for a venue where they can publish responses to our current social and political situation, but also to anyone who needs a quiet place where one can contemplate the America of diversity and hope.

You can find my square here.

 

photo: My pussy hat. Taken by me. CC.